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Klamath County Sheriff’s Department(KLAMATH FALLS, Ore.) -- A man returned to his property in Oregon earlier this week only to find that his log cabin was gone.

It wasn't wrecked from bad weather or bulldozed to the ground. The entire building was just not there.

Police eventually found the cabin 3,750 feet away from its original location and now believe they have figured out who took it.

The case appears to involve a complicated ownership agreement regarding the property, a fire at the main house on the land that displaced the people who had lived there, and changing romantic relationships, according to investigators from the Klamath Falls Sheriff's Department.

"Quite frankly, it's one of the most unusual moments I've ever seen," Sheriff Frank Skrah said at a news conference Thursday.

The approximately 1,200-square-foot cabin was a secondary building on a larger property that was jointly-owned by three individuals -- a man, his ex-wife and the ex-wife's former flame.

The former flame built the cabin and was the only person listed on the home loan, sheriff's officials said. However, the other man allegedly then sold the cabin to a neighbor without the owner's permission, the officials added.

The former flame returned to the property on Tuesday for the first time in months to find the log cabin missing and then reported it to police.

Police were able to determine that the neighbor who paid $3,000 for the cabin had no idea it was stolen.

The home was first listed as $10,000, but the buyer was able to haggle down the price, officials said.

"To quote him, 'It was a steal of a deal,'" a sheriff's department official said at a news conference on Thursday.

The investigation is ongoing and no charges have been filed.


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Cynthia Letson(EASTON, Calif.) -- "They weren’t fancy. They were just decent people that were always committed to each other, no matter the situation."

That's how Donna Scharton remembers her beloved parents, Floyd and Violet Hartwig, before they died on Feb. 11.

The couple, who had been married for 67 years, died in their home in a very Notebook-like situation.

As the two laid close to one another, Scharton and other immediate family members pushed their beds close together as they all knew the end was near.

"My mom had dementia for the last several years and around the holidays we noticed she was going down," Scharton of Fresno, California said. "Then, I got a call from the doctor saying 'your dad has kidney failure and he has two weeks to live.' So, we decided to put them in hospice together."

Prior to their declining health, the Hartwigs owned a ranch in Easton, California. The two met while in grammar school and had developed a relationship upon Mr. Hartwig returning home from the Navy.

They married on Aug. 16, 1947 and had two other children, Carol and Kenneth, in addition to Scharton.

"My dad was in the Navy for six years," she told ABC News. "He worked for the J.B. Hill Company delivering eggs and then for a feed company. Mom stayed home, helped take care of the ranch, and cooked all the meals. She made breakfast for dad at 4:30 in the morning every day."

Scharton said that although his health was deteriorating, her father's main priority was the love of his life.

"He would tell the doctor, 'I'm okay I just want her fixed',” she added. "That was his concern; not how bad his pain was, but that he wanted my mom fixed."

"We could tell my dad was in a lot more pain," Scharton cried. "We said 'it's getting close,' so we pushed the hospital beds together as far as we could. We put their hands together, and my dad died holding my mom's hand. Mom was not coherent, but we told her that dad had passed away and that he was waiting for her. She died five hours later."

Scharton's daughter, Cynthia Letson, remembers her grandparents as simple people who just loved having their family beside them.

"They never, ever asked for anything," she said. "All they ever wanted was their family and it was amazing that they got that in the end."

In honor of their legacy, Scharton is holding onto warm memories of her mother and father.

"Mom did a lot of sewing – made our clothes and stuff," Scharton said. "She joined the PTA at school and she loved doing her crossword puzzles. They were very devoted and when dad came home we'd always have supper together.

"I remember them kissing each other goodbye every morning. I remember mom called him Blondie because he had such pretty blonde hair and blue eyes."

"What I want people to get out of this story is my dad's commitment to serving his country and loving his family,” she said. “What we felt was keeping them alive was the will to live, and that they didn’t want to let go of each other."


Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.


Joe Robbins/Getty Images(NEW YORK) -- The woman who accused football star Jameis Winston of rape is speaking out in a new film.

Erica Kinsman shared her story in The Hunting Ground, which filmmakers say seeks to expose the epidemic of violence and institutional cover-ups sweeping college campuses across America.

According to Kinsman, the alleged incident occurred at Winston’s off-campus apartment on Dec. 7, 2012 following a night of drinking. At the time, she was a student at Florida State University, and Winston was the university’s superstar quarterback.

“I just want to know, ‘Why me?’” she said in the film, which is appearing in theaters starting Friday. “It doesn’t really make sense.”

Kinsman told filmmakers Amy Ziering and Kirby Dick that when she identified her alleged rapist, she was told by the lead detective, “This is a huge football town. You really should think long and hard about whether you want to press charges or not.”

While the Tallahassee Police’s handling of the case has been criticized, no charges were filed in the case, with Florida State Attorney Willie Meggs citing insufficient evidence. Winston -- who has maintained that the encounter was consensual -- was also cleared in a university code of conduct hearing.

Winston is slated to be one of the top picks in this year’s NFL Draft.

Ziering contends that Florida State University’s desire to protect its reputation, and the athlete involved, contributed to how the case was handled.

“Here's a family that really believed in law enforcement, really believed in their school, in their institution, could not imagine it would not do the right thing by them,” Ziering said.

Kinsman eventually left the university. The filmmakers noted Kinsman faced backlash after coming forward.

“The reprisals she experienced...she received all kinds of very aggressive comments on social media,” Dick said.

A university official told ABC News FSU was not aware Kinsman ever said she felt driven out of the university, adding that university officials "went to extraordinary lengths to support her."

"FSU uses a nationally recognized victim-centered approach in handling sexual assault complaints, and our victim advocate professionals were by Ms. Kinsman's side throughout this case," said Browning Brooks, assistant vice president for university communications. "She was provided academic accommodations regarding class schedules and exams, access to counseling and was informed about all of her options in deciding whether to initiate criminal or student conduct charges under Title IX."

The filmmakers are thankful that the subjects in The Hunting Ground agreed to participate in the movie, and believe that the victims’ voices can help people to consider the significance of college sexual assaults.

“I hope it radically changes the way our culture and our country views this issue and views these crimes,” Ziering said.

The Hunting Ground, which was shown at Sundance Film Festival, features a Lady Gaga song with Diane Warren, “Til It Happens to You.”


Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.


Stockton Police Department via Getty Images(NEW YORK) -- “Hot Convict” Jeremy Meeks says he’s eager to serve out his sentence and is looking ahead to starting a career in modeling and acting.

“I’m in a place where I will be able to provide for my family and really change my life,” Meeks told ABC News from a Nevada prison. “I never thought that everyone in the world would recognize me for my looks, so I feel extremely blessed and very thankful.”

The chisel-jawed, blue-eyed Californian became an Internet sensation last year when his mug shot went viral after the Stockton Police Department posted it on its Facebook page. Meeks was sentenced several weeks ago to 27 months of prison on weapon charges, but hopes for a November release that accounts for time served and good behavior.

Meeks is now working with agent Jim Jordan of White Cross Management and said he plans to take full advantage of his viral fame.

In preparation for his release and foray into modeling, Meeks said that he is working on getting ripped.

“I eat healthy. I do a lot of push-ups, pull-ups, dips, burpees, and I stay very active,” he said.

Meeks said he wants to try his hand at both modeling and acting. “I wish I could be on a show like Sons of Anarchy,” said Meeks.

Jordan is confident Meeks’ notoriety can propel him into a successful career. “There is a sea of opportunities waiting for him,” Jordon said, who is working to set Meeks up with “modeling agencies around the world, endorsement deals and reality show interests.”

As for that mug shot, Meeks said he wasn't intentionally giving his best “blue steel” for the picture.

“I was just thinking about missing my family,” he said. “I was really thinking about my son a lot at that moment, that was the only thing that was on my mind.”

Until then, Meeks said he is keeping his head down and relying on backing from the outside.

“I've got a lot of support my family, my friends, and from my fans -- I get hundreds and hundreds of letters every month. I’m very thankful for all the support I've been getting,” Meeks said.


Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.


Obtained by ABC News(NEW YORK) -- The parents of an American journalist beheaded by terrorists on video expressed pity for the "tragic" choices by their son's apparent killer, "Jihadi John," but said ISIS must be destroyed.

Hours after the masked man's identity was revealed Thursday by The Washington Post and confirmed by government officials, slain journalist James Foley's mother Diane told ABC News that she was surprised to learn alleged ISIS "executioner" Mohammed Emwazi came from a "well-to-do" family in London.

"He had a privileged background, if you will," Foley said, referring to Emwazi's purportedly middle class background and college degree in computer science from the University of Westminster. "So, to me, it's just tragic that he would, such a talented young man would lose his way and become part of such a brutal network as ISIS."

"It's not all about him. It's about, you know, this whole culture of hate and brutality and all that ISIS is. I mean, if it hadn't been this young man, it would have been another one. This young man is one of the very saddest," she said.

But that's as much as Foley said she's willing to think about Emwazi.

Asked how she reacted as a mom to the public disclosure of the name of the man who drew a knife across her son's neck on video, she replied, "We would like, you know -- ISIS needs to be stopped."

James's father, John Foley, agreed that Emwazi is only one of the terrorists who must face justice for brutally slaying their son and so many others. If ever captured alive, he might not attend his trial. "I doubt it. I really doubt it. I mean I'm not interested in who he is or what he's done. I'm done with the guy," he told ABC News in Tucson.

The Foleys spoke to University of Arizona journalism students on Wednesday on a visit to the desert southwest state and said they may visit the family of another American killed while in ISIS hands, Kayla Mueller of Prescott.

Before Foley’s death, his family was able to assemble a team of hostage negotiators to hunt for their son.

When some Spanish and French hostages were ransomed in March and April last year, the team debriefed them and learned that all the Westerners, including James and Kayla, were held captive together as a group at sites near Raqqa, Syria -- intelligence they feel the U.S. government didn't act on fast enough.

"Obviously, at that point we wanted as much as possible to be done to secure his release and that obviously didn't happen," John Foley said on Wednesday in the interview.

A raid by an entire squadron of America's elite Delta Force hit an aging oil refinery site on July 3. But President Obama recently told BuzzFeed News that they missed the hostages being moved by "one or two days."


Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.





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