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Photo by David Ryder/Getty Images(MARYSVILLE, Wash.) -- Shaylee Chuckulnaskit, 14, a victim in the shooting at a Washington state high school, died on Friday, officials at Providence Regional Medical Center Everett said. She was the fourth person to die in the shooting.

Two other students — Andrew Fryberg, 15, and Nate Hatch, 14, remain at Harborview Medical Center in critical condition. Hatch suffered a gunshot wound to his jaw.

"Our hearts are broken at the passing of our beautiful daughter. Shay means everything to us. In Shay’s short life she has been a radiant light bringing us incredible joy and happiness. She has been a loving daughter, a caring sister, a devoted friend and a wonderful part of our community. We can’t imagine life without her," the Chuckulnaskit family said in a statement released through the hospital.

Zoe Galasso, 14, died from the shooting a week ago. Gia Soriano, also 14, died Sunday at Providence Hospital.

Chuckulnaskit was critically injured in the shooting at Marysville-Pilchuck High School in Marysville, Washington.

Authorities have identified the shooter as Jaylen Fryberg. Fryberg, 14 -- who shot five people before killing himself inside the school -- was a member of a prominent family in the Tulalip Tribes and, according to a tribe member, state Sen. John McCoy, he was highly regarded there.

"A lot of folks were considering him that he would move up the culture ranks and become a leader," McCoy said. "He had that kind of charisma and raw talent."

All the victims in the shooting were either relatives or friends of Fryberg's, McCoy said. Two of the victims, Nate Hatch, 14, and Andrew Fryberg, 15, are relatives of the shooter, according to Hatch's grandfather and a source within the Tulalip Tribes.


Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio


AndreyPopov/iStockphoto/Thinkstock(MEXICO CITY) -- U.S. Marine reservist Sgt. Andrew Tahmooressi, jailed in Mexico on gun charges since March, was ordered released by a judge in Mexico on Friday, according to documents released by the court.

The California native, 26, was arrested on March 31, after he says he got lost and crossed the Mexican border with three firearms in his pickup truck. Tahmooressi served two tours of duty in Afghanistan.

The possession of any weapon restricted for the use of the Army is a federal crime in Mexico regardless of whether visitors declare it or not upon entering the country.

"It is with an overwhelming and humbling feeling of relief that we confirm that Andrew was released
today after spending 214 days in Mexican Jail," Tahmooressi's family said in a statement. "He is back on American soil and will shortly resume treatment for both his pre-existing Combat Related PTSD and the residual effects of months of incarceration – which has taken a toll on him far worse than his two tours in Afghanistan."

Tahmooressi’s mother Jill in July said she was able to spent 20 minutes with her son after a court hearing, when he was ordered to be held in jail.

“He’s very strong. He’s very strong and positive. And he’s confident,” she said then.

The State Department has been actively engaged in the case. Consular officers have visited Tahmooressi numerous times, and at least 71 members of Congress have signed a bi-partisan letter asking the judge for leniency.

Unlike American law, in Mexico one is guilty until proven innocent and the decision rests solely in the judge’s hands.


Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio


Mr_Twister/iStockphoto/Thinkstock(CHICAGO) -- Ah, the sea, the crashing surf...the highway?

Drivers in the middle of Chicago Friday saw waves crashing where they're definitely not supposed to be, as high winds blew Lake Michigan's waters across the northbound lanes of Lake Shore Drive.

The crashing waves and flooding stretched from North Avenue to Division Street, according to ABC News station WLS, and prompted city officials to reduce available lanes on the road and advise drivers to go another way, according to local reports.

The whole thing was captured on video. Take a look below as the waves crash.


More ABC US news | ABC Health News


Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio


fotokon/iStockphoto/Thinkstock(MIAMI) -- A Florida inmate who was serving life in prison for armed robbery escaped from prison on Friday.

Ronald McCoy, 39, was sentenced in 2004 to life in prison after he was convicted of multiple counts of armed robbery, as well as charges of aggravated assault and carrying a concealed weapon.

McCoy had previously served time for a separate armed robbery in 1992.

It was not immediately clear how McCoy escaped from the prison. The Florida Department of Corrections is working with local law enforcement and Florida Department of Law Enforcement to apprehend him.

The Florida DOC describes McCoy as a 6-foot-3 inch tall, 200 pound black man with black hair, brown eyes and tattoos on his left bicep and the right side of his chest.


Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio


zebra3/iStockphoto/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- The federal government has received, but is refusing to disclose, an urgent plan to re-test the safety of guardrails found on American highways across the country amid accusations they are dangerous to motorists.

Just under the deadline, Trinity Industries, maker of the controversial ET-Plus system, submitted plans to the government for the new tests, as 30 states have announced they’ve already banned new installations of the guardrail until it is proven safe.

“The Federal Highway Administration received Trinity’s ET-Plus test plan. The FHWA will expeditiously, but carefully, review the plan,” a statement provided Friday from the FHWA to ABC News reads.

The government agency says it will review what Trinity Industries sent “with a sense of urgency” but does not have a timetable in which it will respond to the company. Starting 10 days ago, Trinity had been given until Friday to submit plans or the government would rule the commonly-used guardrail ineligible for American roads.

The FHWA would not disclose further information about the crash test plans and directed requests for details of the “draft plan” to Trinity. A spokesperson for Trinity told ABC News it is not sharing details publicly at this time.

“The public should be able to review these materials,” said Sean Kane, founder of The Safety Institute. “We can’t tell the difference between the regulators and the regulated here. This coziness has been part of the problem since the beginning.”

Thirty states have now announced they are suspending further installation of the ET-Plus and one state, Virginia, said it is making plans to remove the guardrails from its highways entirely. Late last week, Trinity Industries said it would halt sales of the ET-Plus.

The demand from the FHWA for crash tests came a day after a Texas jury ruled that Trinity had defrauded the government by altering an approved guardrail end terminal design nearly a decade ago and then failing to tell federal or state transportation departments about the changes until questions were raised in 2012. Trinity was ordered to pay $175 million in damages -- a figure expected to triple by statutory mandate.

The ET-Plus System was the subject of an ABC News 20/20 investigation in September that looked into allegations from crash victims that the modified guardrail can malfunction when struck from the front by their vehicles’. Rather than ribboning out and absorbing the impact as designed, the guardrails “locked up” and speared straight through the cars, severing the motorists’ limbs in some cases.

Lawyers for the plaintiff in the Texas case, Josh Harman, expressed concern about any planned crash tests to the FHWA and have asked to be involved in discussions prior to the testing of the ET-Plus.

“While we believe crash testing is important, we have several concerns about the protocol outlined by your office for testing and... we believe that testing alone would be insufficient to determine whether the ET-Plus should be eligible for federal reimbursement,” wrote attorney George Carpinello.

Dean Sicking, a renowned guardrail engineer who authored manuals for crash testing –- and who also testified against Trinity Industries in the federal trial -- wrote to the agency, questioning the type of tests it may conduct, concerned that there has been an “ongoing deception of the FHWA” by Trinity Industries.

Trinity has maintained the guardrails are safe, noting that the FHWA approved the modified guardrail for use after questions about the modifications were raised in 2012. The company plans to appeal the Texas verdict and has previously told ABC News it has a “high degree of confidence in the performance and integrity” of the ET-Plus system.


Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio





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