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Andrew Burton/Getty Images(BOSTON) -- Police are ramping up security for Monday's Boston Marathon in the wake of last year's bombings.

Four-thousand police officers and 500 undercover plain-clothes detectives will be staged from the start line to the finish line.

Kurt Schwartz, Massachusetts' Undersecretary for Homeland Security and Emergency Management in the Executive Office of Public Safety and Security, said every section of the 26.2 mile race will be watched by cameras, which will be monitored in an underground, high-tech command center.

"A lot of eyes," Schwartz told ABC News. "They're all watching the public, watching the crowds, trying to detect suspicious behavior, trying to manage areas that just get too crowded… We have expanded across the board."

The command center will also be communicating in real-time with other offices across eight nearby cities and towns along the marathon path.

"We'll be looking for somebody who just doesn't feel right," Boston's new police commissioner Bill Evans said. "The characteristics – a lot of our officers, during their training, [are] looking at the characteristics of someone who might be carrying explosives."

Beyond just watching, Schwartz said security officials will be tailoring their tactical security on the ground throughout the day of the marathon based on what the surveillance cameras and officers on the scene are seeing.

Evans told ABC News that though security will be tight, it won't be overwhelming for runners or attendees.

"I don't want it to be an armed camp where people are going to be intimidated by the police presence," he said.

Evans' men got a trial run last week when an alleged hoaxer dropped two bags near the finish line of the marathon, in a similar manner to how the real explosives were planted last year. Authorities reacted quickly and destroyed the ultimately harmless objects.

"It was a nice drill," Evans said. "It just got us on our toes a little earlier… But I think we did a super job. We did what we were trained to do."

Authorities suspect last year's bombing was carried out by Tamerlan and Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, two brothers from Dagestan who lived in the U.S. Tamerlan was killed in a shootout with police days after the explosions. Dzhokhar was arrested and has pleaded not guilty to 30 counts related to the bombing. If convicted, he could face the death penalty.

Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio


Courtesy Casey Messer/Helicon Property Restoration (ORLANDO, Fla.) -- A 50-foot deep sinkhole has been filled after it threatened two homes at a Florida retirement community.

Residents had to be evacuated after the ground opened up Saturday between two houses at a community called The Villages, north of Orlando.

Workers spent all Saturday night filling the hole with sand and cement to stop it from spreading.

Project manager Rich Kay said this was "by far the most extreme" sinkhole he has seen.

No injuries were reported.

Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio


iStock/Thinkstock(JACKSON, Maine) -- A run-in with an angry moose ended without injury for a pair of New Hampshire snowmobilers, but they say that the incident has changed how they think about wildlife.

Janis and Bob Powell saw the moose while snowmobiling outside Jackson, Maine, on Friday. They followed it on a trail for a few minutes, but it then came to halt.

"His fur was standing up, his ears were back, his head went low and [we] definitely knew something was up," Janis Powell said.

The moose stomped toward her husband, forcing him to duck behind his snowmobile.

"The only thing I could think of what I had to put between myself and the moose, and unfortunately that was just the snowmobile," Bob Powell said.

The moose charged again and Bob Powell ran to his wife's snowmobile, narrowly missing a headbutt from the animal.

Janis Powell then fired a warning shot into the air.

"I knew what size gun I had and that I might make it even more angry," she said.

But the moose then trotted off. Neither it nor the Powells were injured.

"We both have a new appreciated for moose and wildlife in general and will definitely be keeping more of a distance," Janis Powell said.

She added that they've seen moose on the trails before but the animals typically are scared off.

Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio


Courtesy Casey Messer/Helicon Property Restoration (ORLANDO, Fla.) -- A 50-foot deep sinkhole threatened two homes at a Florida retirement community Saturday.

Residents had to be evacuated after the ground opened up between two houses at a community called The Villages, north of Orlando.

Crews responded to the scene and poured concrete into the ground to stop the hole from spreading.

"Our biggest thing at this point is just try to prevent it from spreading underneath these homes, so we don't lose them," Casey Messer with Helicon Property Restoration said.

Officials say the sinkhole has been filled; no injuries were reported.

Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio


Andrew Burton/Getty Images(BOSTON) -- Police are ramping up security for Monday's Boston Marathon in the wake of last year's bombings.

Four-thousand police officers and 500 undercover plain-clothes detectives will be staged from the start line to the finish line.

Kurt Schwartz, Massachusetts' Undersecretary for Homeland Security and Emergency Management in the Executive Office of Public Safety and Security, said every section of the 26.2 mile race will be watched by cameras, which will be monitored in an underground, high-tech command center.

"A lot of eyes," Schwartz told ABC News. "They're all watching the public, watching the crowds, trying to detect suspicious behavior, trying to manage areas that just get too crowded… We have expanded across the board."

The command center will also be communicating in real-time with other offices across eight nearby cities and towns along the marathon path.

"We'll be looking for somebody who just doesn't feel right," Boston's new police commissioner Bill Evans said. "The characteristics – a lot of our officers, during their training, [are] looking at the characteristics of someone who might be carrying explosives."

Beyond just watching, Schwartz said security officials will be tailoring their tactical security on the ground throughout the day of the marathon based on what the surveillance cameras and officers on the scene are seeing.

Evans told ABC News that though security will be tight, it won't be overwhelming for runners or attendees.

"I don't want it to be an armed camp where people are going to be intimidated by the police presence," he said.

Evans' men got a trial run last week when an alleged hoaxer dropped two bags near the finish line of the marathon, in a similar manner to how the real explosives were planted last year. Authorities reacted quickly and destroyed the ultimately harmless objects.

"It was a nice drill," Evans said. "It just got us on our toes a little earlier… But I think we did a super job. We did what we were trained to do."

Authorities suspect last year's bombing was carried out by Tamerlan and Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, two brothers from Dagestan who lived in the U.S. Tamerlan was killed in a shootout with police days after the explosions. Dzhokhar was arrested and has pleaded not guilty to 30 counts related to the bombing. If convicted, he could face the death penalty.

Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio





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