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Low-Fat Doughnuts Really Do Exist

File photo. iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- If you could eat doughnuts without the guilt, would you?

Turns out, you can, almost. And there's still a pinch of guilt, but only about one-fourth of the guilt you would experience after eating a typical doughnut.

Holey Donuts, the online-only doughnut shop, is about to open its first retail location in New York City. The store opens next month, but ABC News staffers got to sample a variety of the low-fat doughnuts fresh from the still-unopened store in a very unofficial, unscientific taste test. Could they be as good as the real thing?

In a word, yes. Or in another word, "amazing." And still another, "fine."

Every reaction to the doughnuts was a positive one, but enthusiasm varied considerably. One thing that was agreed upon by all: the doughnuts were far more dough-y than a typical doughnut. Comparisons were made to a bagel and store-bought French bread. "You know, the dough-y kind...not the crusty one," one sampler said.

Another point made by several tasters: The doughnuts are sweet, but not too sweet. "Sweet enough," as one photo editor on the informal panel put it.

Indeed. The company claims a "huge" online fan base for the treats it touts as "great-tasting donuts without the fat, calories and guilt."

The company said its "exclusive, yet secret cooking process" results in a doughnut with a fraction of the fat of regular doughnuts: 3 to 5 grams of fat compared with 15 to 40 grams in others. The doughnuts contain no artificial sweeteners.

The store’s model will be an environmentally friendly green business with the concept of “nothing on display, nothing to throw away." Instead of keeping shelves full of product, doughnuts will be ordered from a photo menu board. Customers will watch the doughnuts as they are being filled, frosted and boxed after placing their order. The store will also carry a line of natural juices from RAAW. There will also be green tea and the brand's own fair trade "Simple Coffee."

The store is in Manhattan’s Greenwich Village at 101 Seventh Ave. South. It opens May 4 and each doughnut will cost $3.85.

Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio


Bruce Glikas/FilmMagic(NEW YORK) -- Debra Messing has never looked anything less than drop-dead gorgeous.

You would never know it, but the Will & Grace icon, 45, recently made an effort to eat better for her health and it's definitely paid off big time.

"About two to three years ago, I made a very, very big change the way I approach nutrition," she told ABC News. "I think it made a big difference in how I look or at least how I'm perceived to look."

She continued, "I lost like 20 pounds, it wasn't my intention, that wasn't why I made the change. I made the change because I was just tired all the time. For a long time, I just accepted that was the plight of a working, single mother. You're juggling everyday."

Messing admitted that she grew up eating "crappy foods."

"I grew up on fast food and candy every day," she said. "Pizza and french fries and burgers -- I love food and I've always loved food. Vegetables were not a part of my life at all"

Now, she is focused and feeling the difference from head-to-toe.

"I'm just eating really, really clean healthy foods," she said. "Obviously I knew there was an association between what I ate and whether I gained 10 pounds or lost 10 pounds, but it never really became a reality for me that it shows on the outside in your hair and skin and even the clarity of your eyes. I was just stubborn."

Messing, who just filmed a new pilot The Mysteries of Laura, said she starts every morning with a green juice.

"[That includes] kale and spinach and celery and ginger and lemon and cucumber," she said. "At least I know I'm starting my day and getting a big shot of nutrients that I need. I start out strong...For the pilot, I was shooting 15, 16, 17 hours everyday. I really depended on having that juice once or twice a day. It really gave me more energy. That made an obvious difference for me, in me feeling strong."

Messing spoke to ABC as part of a collaboration with Zyrtec. Along with eating clean, the actress takes Zyrtec because of allergies.

"Allergies have been a lifelong struggle for me," she said. "I'm allergic to everything. I'm allergic to pollen, grass, mold, mildew and dust. You name it and I'm allergic to it."

Now with the proper help, Messing said she is grateful she can wake up in the morning without the constant fear of an allergy attack.

"I know I'm going to be okay, whether I'm going out to Central Park with my 10-year-old son to play soccer in the middle of the pollen vortex, or doing a Broadway play in a 100-year-old theater covered in dust," she added.

Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio


iStock/360/Thinkstock(HAMILTON, N.Y.) -- If you think your significant other is the sun, moon and stars all rolled up into one, your high expectations could come crashing down around your head.

Colgate University psychologist Jennifer Tomlinson contends putting your partner on a pedestal might ultimately harm the relationship.

Tomlinson and her research team conducted various experiments with couples, both married and unmarried, to learn how they felt about one another through questionnaires.

The first conclusion wasn’t at all surprising: people in relationships are generally happier when their partner sees them in a slightly better light than they see themselves.

However, there also comes a point when too much idealizing becomes a dangerous thing if the object of praise starts to pull away after realizing they either can’t or won’t live up to a partner’s expectations.

Tomlinson maintains, “While it may be tempting to provide effusive praise, I think it's also important to communicate understanding and validation of a person's core identity.”

Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio


Fuse/Thinkstock(ANN ARBOR, Mich.) -- A survey conducted for the Journal of the American Medical Association finds that 69 percent of respondents believe that health plans offered in the U.S. should automatically cover birth control.

Study researcher Dr. Michelle Moniz, an OB/GYN at the University of Michigan Medical School, says that the bulk of those supporting a birth control mandate are women, blacks and Hispanics.

The survey asked 3,500 people their opinions about what services should be required in health plans with about 2,100 responding to the questionnaire.

Eighty-five percent of the respondents want mandated mammograms, colonoscopies and vaccinations in medical coverage while at least three-quarters also support exams for diabetes and high cholesterol, mental health care, and dental care.

Ten percent want coverage for everything except birth control. This group is mostly made up of men, people over 60 and those without children.

Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio


ABC/ Craig Sjodin(NEW YORK) -- You know Chef Michael Symon as the co-host of ABC’s The Chew. But what you may not know on this Earth Day is that Symon comes from a long line of gardeners.

“My grandfather had his own garden, my father had his own garden, and I’ve had my own garden for over 20 years,” Symon said in an interview with ABC News Radio.

“There’s something so soothing about digging in the dirt,” he said. “With the stress we all have in our day-to-day lives, there’s nothing better to me than going out in the morning with a cup of coffee and putzin’ around in my garden.”

Symon’s garden includes multiple varieties of heirloom tomatoes and chilies, eggplants and “every herb under the sun that you could fathom.”

Here are seven tips from Chef Symon that will have you gardening -- and eating! -- in no time:

Take a cue from the sun.
“You always need sun. The best sun is morning sun,” he said. “So when you’re planning on where to put your garden in your yard, stand outside and look where you’re getting the best morning sun. And that’s a very good place to start.”

Mix it up!
Never plant something in the same place two years in a row, Symon said. “Tomatoes take certain nutrients out of the soil that peppers may not, so you want to keep moving things around your garden. There are even parts of my garden that I leave dormant for a year or two to kind of rejuvenate the soil.”

Space ‘em out.
“Plants are like people. If you crowd them a little bit and they actually touch as they’re growing, they tend to grow better. You know, they’re happier. You need less water. You need less fertilizer.  And you could grow more in a compact space.”

Consider composting.
“We always keep a big compost at our house,” Symon said. “We’re using coffee grounds” and other things to create and maintain healthy soil.

Get to know Mother Nature.
“Understand what bugs eliminate other bugs,” he said. For instance, “if you have a lot of slugs (in your garden), let ladybugs in. They’re typically going to eliminate a good amount of those. Eliminate certain pests by adding other pests.”

Get the kids involved.
“It’ll make them less picky eaters because they’ll always want to try to cook things that they’ve grown.”

Use your taste buds.
“Things that taste good together typically grow well together,” Symon said. “Next to my tomatoes will be basil or peppers or eggplant.”

NOTE: some responses have been edited for brevity.

Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio





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