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iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Conception has gone social.

Pee parties -- also known as POAS, or Pee on a Stick Parties -- are the latest way women are taking what was once a very private moment very public.

The trend was first spotted by BabyCenter.com. "They will discuss what day they are going to test," said Rebecca Michals, director of global community and customer service, "and then come back to post the results."

Is this the ultimate in oversharing? Maybe not. The intention behind the parties and posts might be just the opposite.

"They [the women] may not want to tell people they are trying to conceive in real life, so they come to the message boards to talk," Michals said. "It gives them support during the two-week-wait.”

The two-week wait, also called the TWW, is the time between sex that intended to result in pregnancy and the time when an over-the-counter pregnancy test can give accurate results.

The boards have certainly served as a support system for Christine Straut-Kinnan of Albuquerque, N.M. She was pregnant in December but had a miscarriage. She's now anxious to conceive again and has participated in several pee parties.

"The ladies," she said, referring to the other women on the message boards, "have been a Godsend. We share in the excitement of the girls who get positives and in the sorrows of those who are still negative. It helps pass the time between the fertile weeks and when you eventually pee on a stick."

Straut-Kinnan said her next POAS party will be in about three weeks from now. How fast will she post the results?

"Within an hour."

Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio


ABC News(NEW YORK) -- Months before former Dancing with the Stars co-host and ET correspondent Samantha Harris received a diagnosis of breast cancer, the TV personality had a mammogram and got an “all clear” from her doctor.

The mother-of-two said it was a “gut feeling” that the lump in her breast was something more that led her on a months-long journey of tests and doctors.

“It took me four months to go, ‘This doesn’t sit right with me,’” Harris, 40, told ABC News’ Amy Robach.  “Four months later, when I went to see my specialist, I had a needle biopsy, after two ultrasounds, and I had an MRI right before we scheduled a lumpectomy.”

“Even the pathology they do in the operating room said no cancer, so I came out and my husband, right next to me, said, ‘Babe, you’re all clear,’” Harris said. “I didn’t even take him to the follow up because I thought I didn’t have cancer.”

Harris was alone in her doctor’s office when she received the news that she did, in fact, have breast cancer.

“I started to realize that they kept saying the word ‘Carcinoma,’” Harris said.  “That means cancer, so I guess I have cancer.”

“Then the tears welled up in my eyes and it wasn’t until the surgeon left the room that all I wanted to do was crumble into my husband’s arms.”

Harris said she decided to have a double mastectomy to treat her cancer because it “came down to percentages” and the double mastectomy gave her the “best chance.”

Foremost in Harris’ mind when making the decision, she says, were her two daughters with husband Michael Hess: Josselyn, 6, and Hillary, 3.

“It puts you in a completely different place when you’re a parent and you have a diagnosis like this because you think of all the things you want to make sure you’re present for,” Harris said.  “I lost my dad to colon cancer and he was just 50 and to have him not present when I got married, when I had my first daughter, then my second, has been really hard for me.”

“I always think in the back of my mind, ‘I don’t want to not be there for my kids,’” she said.

Harris says she and Hess together told each of their daughters the news separately so that they could “tailor” what they told them to make it age-appropriate.

Harris said she is now receiving support from the “sisterhood” of breast cancer patients and survivors, including ABC News’ own Robach, who is currently battling breast cancer, and Robin Roberts, who has beat both breast cancer and, more recently, myelodysplastic syndrome or MDS, a rare blood disorder.

“I have to tell you,” Harris said, “reading your story and Robin’s gave me so much inspiration and gave me hope that I too will get through this as you are currently doing and as Robin has, and be stronger and a better person on the other side.”

“This is a sisterhood that you never want to be a part of but the women I have met through this already are incredible women,” Harris said.

Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio


iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- For most women, carrying their own baby is the ultimate joy. More and more women, however, are turning to surrogates to carry their babies, not because they cannot conceive, but because they do not want to.

It’s a trend many are calling “social surrogacy” and one that was recently highlighted in an article in the May issue of Elle magazine.

“This is a wonderful opportunity for women to have more choices,” said Dr. Saira Jhutty, CEO of Conceptual Options LLC, a California-based surrogacy agency.

Jhutty’s agency matches surrogates with women who have nonmedical reasons for not wanting to carry their own babies. The woman who come to her agency have a variety of reasons for wanting a surrogate, from not wanting a pregnancy to interfere with their careers to being afraid of what pregnancy will do to their bodies, Jhutty said.

“We have people who are afraid of being pregnant,” Jhutty said.  “Some people work in an industry where image is very important so they don’t want to have to go through the changes that happen to a woman’s body when they get pregnant.”

But the choice is still a touchy subject, despite the rising interest in “social surrogacy.”

“Women are really guarded about issues involving their bodies and surrogacy because they are afraid of being judged,” said Leslie Steiner, author of The Baby Chase: How Surrogacy Is Transforming the American Family.

The cost is another issue that might give women pause. With surrogacy running $100,000 or more per child, it’s not for everyone.

“You have to ask yourself why you are doing this,” said Dr. Vicken Sahakian, medical director of the Pacific Fertility Center in Los Angeles.  “Is there real benefit for bypassing the beautiful experience of carrying a child?”

Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio


Rich Arden/ESPN(NEW YORK) -- Stuart Scott is an ESPN original and the man GQ magazine once said put the hip-hop in sportscasting.

When the Sportscenter anchor is not at ESPN’s studios, he can be found once or twice a month practicing mixed-martial arts wearing sunglasses, for a very specific reason.

“I’m blind in my left eye,” Scott told ABC News’ Robin Roberts in an interview this week.  “Contrary to what people say, it is not a glass eye so I have to protect my eyes at all cost.”

Scott, 48, was first diagnosed with cancer in November of 2007.

“That was just kind of a surprise when the doctor said, ‘We did a biopsy on your appendix and you have cancer,’” Scott recalled.  “Like the first thought [was], ‘I’m gonna die.’”

“There’s probably an expletive before the thought, ‘I’m gonna die,’ [but I] can’t say it,” he said.  “My second thought was, ‘I’m gonna die and I’m gonna leave my daughters and I can’t do that.”

After two surgeries and six months of chemotherapy, Scott emerged cancer-free.  Two years later, however, the cancer returned in the form of three tumors.

“After that time I kind of realized, at least for me, this is likely gonna be something I’m never gonna kick, so now what?,” Scott said.

Scott says he left his prognosis at that -- “something I’m never gonna kick” -- for a reason.

“I don’t want to know how many years you think I may have left. How many months you think I may have left,” he told Roberts.  “I don’t want to know what stage cancer you think I have because what’s that going to do?”

“Let’s say it’s Stage 4,” Scott said.  “Well, it’s just gonna make me scared, more scared.  I don’t need that.”

In addition to his medical treatments, Scott has taken to fighting his cancer in the gym, training in martial arts at Plus One Defense Systems in West Hartford, Conn.

“It’s for the mend better than any chemo to me. It’s better than any kind of medicine,” Scott said.  “It’s my way of trying to kick cancer’s a**.”

Scott conditions himself with intense workout sessions with his trainer, Darin Reisler.

“It feels good to be winded, having trouble breathing, chest hurts…,” Scott told Roberts in the midst of a workout. “I’m alive.”

Scott says he fights against cancer for his two daughters. “The most important thing I do is I’m a dad,” he said.

Scott’s oldest daughter, Taelor, was 12 when he was first diagnosed in 2007 and is now a 19-year-old college freshman.  His younger daughter, Sydni, was 8 when Scott was first diagnosed and is now a 14-year-old who loves to sing.

“I want to walk them down the aisle,” he said.  “There are a lot of great upstanding reasons why, because I’m their dad.  I want to share that moment with them.”

“There are a couple of reasons that are just selfish and competitive, because I don’t want no other dude doing it,” he said.  “That’s my job. That’s my role. I want them to call me when they’re 26-years-old and they want a condo that they can’t really afford but I want them to call me and say, ‘Dad can you give me a loan?,’ because I want to say yes.”

“That’s really what I’ve always wanted and needed with them for them is to be a dad for a long time, as long as they need a father,” Scott said.

Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio


TongRo Images/Thinkstock(CHAPEL HILL, N.C.) -- Caffeine as the ultimate truth serum? It certainly seems to make people less inclined to be dishonest when they feel tired, according to three professors from the University of North Carolina's Kenan-Flagler Business School.

Co-author Michael Christian says that sleep deprivation weakens people’s resolve to be ethically strong, such as when a supervisor tells a worker to do something that’s not entirely on the up-and-up.

In fact, Christian and his colleagues speculate that people who work the hardest are the most susceptible to the power of suggestion because they also tend to be the most tired, thus increasing both hostility and dishonesty.

In an experiment, 171 nurses who worked long shifts were divided into two group in which one received plain chewing gum while the other chewed gum laced with caffeine that was the equivalent of two cups of coffee.

When encouraged to “go along with a lie in order to earn some extra money," the caffeinated group consistently refused to accede to the request.

Christian says this shows that “caffeine can help you resist by strengthening your self-control and willpower when you're exhausted.” Just the same, the researchers recommend employers don’t overwork their workers or put them in positions when significant control is needed when long hours can’t be avoided.

Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio





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